How to Pick Up and Hold a Newborn Baby
Auto Beauty Business Culture Dieting DIY Events Fashion Finance Food Freelancing Gardening Health Hobbies Home Internet Jobs Law Local Media Men's Health Mobile Nutrition Parenting Pets Pregnancy Products Psychology Real Estate Relationships Science Seniors Sports Technology Travel Wellness Women's Health

How to Pick Up and Hold a Newborn Baby

Whichever way you choose to pick and hold your baby, always make sure you fully support his head and neck. Your baby isn't as fragile as you might think, so don't be scared to pick and hold your newborn baby. The more confident you are, the better you'll be at picking up and holding your newborn baby, and that, in turn, makes for a content baby.

How to pick up a newborn baby

This information is for everyone, especially for new mothers and the men who think that being female automatically means you know how to pick up and hold a newborn baby. Picking up and holding a newborn takes practice and in time, you can be as good at picking up and holding a newborn as any mother can. Many men, oddly enough, have a major advantage over women picking up and holding a newborn, given their hands are so big!

In the first weeks of baby's life, just make sure that when you pick up and hold your newborn baby, you pick up and hold the whole baby so there isn't anything (like arms, legs, heads, etc.) dangling or not being supported.

The most important part you want to be extra careful of when you pick up and hold a newborn baby, in the first 2 months in particular, is the baby's neck. Not to be funny, but the oversized baby head can be rather heavy for its tiny little baby neck to handle; plus, the neck muscles aren't yet developed and don't know their part so exercise extreme caution and support the neck when you pick up and hold a newborn baby.

As with much of what you do with or to your baby, tell them when you're going to pick up and hold your newborn baby, or when you're going to put them down. This is but one way to start teaching your baby the art of anticipation and communication. In time, your baby will begin understanding what you say and won't be so startled at your actions.

When you pick up and hold your newborn baby, slide your arm along the baby's back until your hand supports the head and neck and do your best to lift them gently and steadily in one swift motion. If, per chance, your moves aren't too smooth, if by accident you jerked your newborn baby or started them, do what any mature adult would do in such an instance and apologize immediately for your actions! This will teach your baby to not only be careful in the future in his own endeavors, but to have good manners and apologize for his actions if need-be.

How to hold a newborn baby

Once you've picked up your baby, you should adjust him horizontally by transferring your baby to the crook of your other arm, making sure his head is cradled yet snugly in your elbow, and his body supported along your forearm. If you would rather take the vertical approach, then pick the baby up gently, all the while supporting the head and neck, and hold them up against one of your shoulders, allowing their little head to peak over the shoulder.

It's good practice, when picking up and holding your newborn, to support the head and neck at all times until the baby has full control of them. That shouldn't take more than 6 weeks for most healthy babies. Keep in mind that babies like to be held close so that they can hear your heartbeat, which not only soothes, comforts and reassures them, it can also lull them into sleep when cranky.

Another thing you might try is to sit down with both feet flat on the floor, and lie your baby directly in your lap: his head and neck supported at your knees, and his feet in your lap.

Whichever way you choose to pick and hold your baby, always make sure you fully support his head and neck. Your baby isn't as fragile as you might think, so don't be scared to pick and hold your newborn baby. The more confident you are, the better you'll be at picking up and holding your newborn baby, and that, in turn, makes for a content baby.

Need an answer?
Get insightful answers from community-recommended
experts
in Babies & Baby Care on Knoji.
Would you recommend this author as an expert in Babies & Baby Care?
You have 0 recommendations remaining to grant today.
Comments (0)
ARTICLE DETAILS
RELATED ARTICLES
RELATED CATEGORIES
ARTICLE KEYWORDS